Search found 165 matches

by Mostlyharmless
Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:00 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Battleship Top Ten
Replies: 626
Views: 108189

Re: Battleship Top Ten

I didn't think that there was such a huge difference in vulnerability but the analogy with the P-51s glycol is quite accurate. The F6F had a radiator for its oil close to the engine while the oil of the F4U was pumped to radiators in the wing roots for cooling. A hit on the oil piping and you are ru...
by Mostlyharmless
Sat Apr 24, 2010 9:21 am
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Interesting article on the Washington and London treaties
Replies: 8
Views: 1377

Re: Interesting article on the Washington and London treaties

The Washington Treaty expired after 31st December 1936. Yamato was ordered in March 1937 and laid down in November 1937.
by Mostlyharmless
Fri Apr 23, 2010 1:55 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Interesting article on the Washington and London treaties
Replies: 8
Views: 1377

Re: Interesting article on the Washintong and London treaties

The point that stands out is that the US had to cut back with its budget cuts, but the cheating by the Japanese had already begun. The cheating is not as clear cut as described. For example, Furutaka was declared as 7100 tons standard as built, which is the figure given by Jentaschura. The Wikipedi...
by Mostlyharmless
Sun Apr 04, 2010 6:30 pm
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: German victory at Jutland
Replies: 57
Views: 13220

Re: German victory at Jutland

I agree with previous posters that German victory was improbable. However, remember the discussion about using absolutes! I tried to produce a possible series of events leading to a German victory some time ago elsewhere (alternatehistory.com) and perhaps someone might like it (one obvious criticism...
by Mostlyharmless
Thu Jan 28, 2010 1:04 pm
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Yamato plans given to USA
Replies: 35
Views: 4933

Yamato plans given to USA

What if someone had given or sold plans of the Yamato class to US intelligence during 1938? How would US ship building or war plans have altered? Would a Montana-like design have been built instead of the Iowas?
by Mostlyharmless
Wed Jan 06, 2010 3:44 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: U=boats vs US subs: an alternative perspective
Replies: 48
Views: 11314

Lack of IJN Lt. Commanders

Another factor at the time was that Japan had no tradition or capacity for a general Liberal education of the officer and middle class ( in the sense of developing free ideas and unfettered thinking ) and much of what is perceived now as fanatical/slavish sticking to objectives/orders might better ...
by Mostlyharmless
Wed Dec 30, 2009 3:55 pm
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: Less seriously torpedo damaged Bismarck
Replies: 64
Views: 6691

Re: Less seriously torpedo damaged Bismarck

Ark Royal's aircraft will surely attack Bismarck on the 27th May and given the low speed they have a good chance of scoring multiple hits. If Ark Royal sinks Bismarck alone, it may change the away everyone thinks before Pearl Harbor. However, if the Luftwaffe is competent, they can get some Bf-110s ...
by Mostlyharmless
Tue Dec 29, 2009 9:33 pm
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: Less seriously torpedo damaged Bismarck
Replies: 64
Views: 6691

Less seriously torpedo damaged Bismarck

What if Bismarck suffers less catastrophic torpedo damage on 26th May 1941, so that her speed is reduced to about 11 to 12 kn but she is able to steer? Let us also suppose that Vian's destroyers do not score a torpedo hit during the following night. Bismarck was about 550 miles (470 kn) from Brest a...
by Mostlyharmless
Mon Dec 14, 2009 10:40 am
Forum: Naval Technology
Topic: "New" HMS Prince of Wales sinking analyzes
Replies: 76
Views: 12385

Re: "New" HMS Prince of Wales sinking analyzes

I know little about welding but my understanding is that the British (and Japanese) used D Steels (DuCol) which were strong but relatively hard to weld successfully. Germany, by contrast, had developed ST52 which was easier to weld and may have been developed to combine strength with ease of welding.
by Mostlyharmless
Tue Dec 08, 2009 6:06 pm
Forum: The Age of Sail (1571-1860)
Topic: Spain´s own naval victories?
Replies: 67
Views: 31801

Re: Spain´s own naval victories?

Talking of plagues there was of course the ''Spanish Flu'' pandemic of 1918/19 which I believe originated in Africa. The name ''Spanish Flu'' brings us back to military history. Spain was neutral in 1918 when the flu was causing devastation in the trenches. The censors prevented any report of this,...
by Mostlyharmless
Mon Nov 16, 2009 5:38 pm
Forum: Naval Technology
Topic: All myths solved
Replies: 106
Views: 19390

Re: All myths solved

I don't think that three destroyers on their own is enough. No I am asking if one destroyer could have been enough i.e. Bismarck takes the destroyer in tow, runs her engines for 20 knots and when she wants to turn to port, signals the destroyer to turn its rudder for a turn to starboard, the destro...
by Mostlyharmless
Mon Nov 16, 2009 12:25 am
Forum: Naval Technology
Topic: All myths solved
Replies: 106
Views: 19390

Re: All myths solved

While reading the interesting article (thanks yellowtail3) at http://www.researcheratlarge.com/Ships/CV11/1944MarchTorpedoDamageSteering.html today, I read a list of "Further steps which could have been taken but which proved to be unnecessary during the INTREPID's voyage" including the idea "Tow a ...
by Mostlyharmless
Sat Nov 14, 2009 5:24 pm
Forum: Naval Technology
Topic: All myths solved
Replies: 106
Views: 19390

Re: Re:

About the rudder arragement: Which WWII (or contemporary BBs) had a rudder arragement that would have prevented a similar situation if hit by a torpedo as Bismarck was? North Carolina, Washington, Massachusetts, Indiana, South Dakota, Alabama, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, and New Jersey . As far as I...
by Mostlyharmless
Fri Oct 02, 2009 1:06 am
Forum: Naval Weapons
Topic: Long Range Gunnery
Replies: 209
Views: 26530

Re: Long Range Gunnery

Why do people use this fact to argue that it's pointless to attempt to hit another ship at any range greater than that five years later in 1945? We are all too lazy to carefully analyze Iowa and New Jersey's action with Nowaki, which should represent the state of the art for February 1944. We know ...
by Mostlyharmless
Sat Sep 05, 2009 8:45 pm
Forum: Naval Weapons
Topic: MK-23 16 In. Naval Shell (Most Powerful Naval Shell Ever)
Replies: 16
Views: 34833

Re: MK-23 16 In. Naval Shell (Most Powerful Naval Shell Ever)

There was a slightly less serious mention of this round on another forum http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/sho ... ight=katie.