Search found 767 matches

by Bill Jurens
Wed Jul 22, 2020 8:17 pm
Forum: Naval Propulsion
Topic: Ships boilers
Replies: 6
Views: 2473

Re: Ships boilers

The situation depends upon the type of boiler in use. Fire-tube boilers, which were not used much in warships after about 1905 or so, contain a good deal of superheated water that can flash into steam if the pressure vessel complex is breached. But, in practical terms, this rarely happens because in...
by Bill Jurens
Mon Jul 13, 2020 4:30 am
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Vanguard vs. Iowa?
Replies: 28
Views: 11437

Re: Vanguard vs. Iowa?

Steve Crandall wrote: "Bill: What percentage chance do you think an Iowa class battleship would have to hit a battleship size target at 30,000 yds? 35,000 yds?" For a battleship-sized target, at 30,000 yards, estimates were 2.7% for Top Spot, 3.5% for Plane Spot, and 3.4% for Radar Spot. There are, ...
by Bill Jurens
Sun Jul 12, 2020 7:40 pm
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Vanguard vs. Iowa?
Replies: 28
Views: 11437

Re: Vanguard vs. Iowa?

I have not been following this thread particularly closely, and it seems to be developing rather rapidly. I am not sure exactly what opinions are wanted here, but if I get the gist of things correctly, I think the question is whether or not accurate gunnery could be achieved at quite large ranges. T...
by Bill Jurens
Fri Jun 19, 2020 8:23 pm
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: Jammed rudders and damage to prop shafts
Replies: 4
Views: 651

Re: Jammed rudders and damage to prop shafts

I'd begin by pointing out that it was not the rudder being jammed at 19 degrees, it was the mechanical rudder INDICATOR which indicated 19 degrees when it ceased operating. Whether that reading could be depended upon remains highly problematical. In any case, you are correct. Steering with engines a...
by Bill Jurens
Sun Jun 14, 2020 7:10 pm
Forum: Books and Reference
Topic: Battleship Bismarck: A Design and Operational History
Replies: 3
Views: 853

Re: Battleship Bismarck: A Design and Operational History

Thanks, Marcelo: Your comments are valid ones. With three authors (and one contributor) there were bound to be areas where disagreements -- apparent or real -- and other areas where some repetition might occur. As many have noted, these sorts of things should have been caught and corrected in the ed...
by Bill Jurens
Thu Jun 04, 2020 2:43 am
Forum: Naval Weapons
Topic: The bomb that sank the Arizona
Replies: 12
Views: 1386

Re: The bomb that sank the Arizona

So far as I know, all of these articles from Warship International are now on the JSTOR website. You may have to pay to access them. It may still be possible to get copies from the INRO archives. The material appears in three issues, No. 39/3, No. 39/4, and No. 40/1 Here is what I think is a full li...
by Bill Jurens
Wed Jun 03, 2020 8:30 pm
Forum: Books and Reference
Topic: Battleship Bismarck: A Design and Operational History
Replies: 3
Views: 853

Re: Battleship Bismarck: A Design and Operational History

Your comment about the deck nomenclatures is legitimate. We did have some problems deciding what system to use, and probably because we were more accustomed to writing comparative rather than descriptive issues, and because we tended to use American nomenclature in regular correspondence -- in effec...
by Bill Jurens
Mon Jun 01, 2020 3:39 pm
Forum: Naval Weapons
Topic: The bomb that sank the Arizona
Replies: 12
Views: 1386

Re: The bomb that sank the Arizona

Without tooting my own horn, readers may like to refer to the three-part (I think) series of articles on the loss of Arizona that Christopher Wright and I published about 10 or 15 years back in Warship International.

Bill Jurens
by Bill Jurens
Mon Jun 01, 2020 3:36 pm
Forum: Naval Weapons
Topic: The bomb that sank the Arizona
Replies: 12
Views: 1386

Re: The bomb that sank the Arizona

The black powder was required because due to it's very small grain size it produced a very large energy input very quickly. It would have been very difficult to evenly ignite all of the much larger nitrocellulose propellant grains otherwise. Actually, although few appreciate this, in many circumstan...
by Bill Jurens
Tue May 26, 2020 6:52 pm
Forum: Naval Technology
Topic: Nagato protection
Replies: 38
Views: 2390

Re: Nagato protection

Another very important thing that is being neglected here is the effect of the supporting 'grillage' of beams etc., underneath the deck armor. The deck plating is not just floating in space. It's really impossible (or at least unsafe) to generalize, but in practical terms if one works the geometry f...
by Bill Jurens
Tue May 26, 2020 7:01 am
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: The Swordfish's Torpedo misses Bismarck
Replies: 17
Views: 1946

Re: The Swordfish's Torpedo misses Bismarck

It's interesting -- but probably in the final analysis, futile -- to speculate as to what might have occurred if the torpedo that struck Bismarck had exploded in a slightly different place. The detailed effects of explosions, particularly in areas of the hull that vary fairly dramatically from place...
by Bill Jurens
Thu May 14, 2020 5:55 am
Forum: Books and Reference
Topic: Acorazados de la segunda guerra mundial
Replies: 9
Views: 2457

Re: Acorazados de la segunda guerra mundial

My compliments to the author. I received my copy a few weeks ago. This is a very good treatment. I'd suggest contacting some English-language publishers, who would be willing to tackle a English edition. Anyhow, very nice work indeed. Highly recommended, even if you don't read Spanish... Bill Jurens.
by Bill Jurens
Wed May 13, 2020 8:22 pm
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: The Swordfish's Torpedo misses Bismarck
Replies: 17
Views: 1946

Re: The Swordfish's Torpedo misses Bismarck

A good question. If she had maintained previous course and speed, Bismarck should have been able to make the French coast sometime around midnight on the 27th. Whether she could have actually docked after that is somewhat questionable. That would have given basically all of the 27th for the British ...
by Bill Jurens
Sun Apr 19, 2020 5:58 pm
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: Comment on Rebuilt US Battleships
Replies: 13
Views: 1120

Re: Comment on Rebuilt US Battleships

It is my general impression that the stability characteristics of Bismarck were largely defined by her rather large beam, which was in turn driven by a need to minimize draft. With length also limited by available building ways and draft fixed at a rather small value, the only ways to increase displ...
by Bill Jurens
Wed Apr 15, 2020 2:37 am
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Updating the KGV class
Replies: 77
Views: 4603

Re: Updating the KGV class

This is an observation that has been made many times before, and may -- or may not -- have much validity. British warships almost certainly did have to provide methods of accommodation that would be compatible for long-sea voyages to remote outposts in the Empire, whereas the Germans probably did no...